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EI77WAW
QSL: QSL Manager EI6AL

IRTS C/O David O'Connor

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EI77WAW

Accepts QSL via:
LoTW: NO
e-qsl: NO
mail QSL:YES

lookups: 30397


The Wild Atlantic Way (Irish Sl an Atlantaigh Fhiin) is a tourism route on the west coast of Ireland that runs for 2,500km (1553 miles) passing through nine Counties and three provinces. Stretching from County Donegal in the North to County Cork in the south and running through Leitrim, Sligo, Mayo, Galway. Clare, Limerick and Kerry - all on the rugged west coast of Ireland overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

From 1st January to 31st December 2017 Irish Radio Amateurs will be on air with nine special calls - EI11WAW through to EI99WAW. Each call will be associated with one of the counties making up the Wild Atlantic Way. Each call will have its own distinctive QSL card depicting a highlight of the county linked to the call.

QSL requests via Clublog or the Buro. Requests for a Direct QSL should be made via Clublog or to EI6AL enclosing $2, or 2 via Paypal to payments@irts.ie

A Certificate will be made available for download to any station that works all nine calls, any band any mode. Sample below. Apply by email to QSL manager EI6AL giving name, call and mode for all calls (Mixed/CW/SSB or Digital). A certificate can also be sent by post - send 5 ($5) to cover postage either direct to EI6AL or via Paypal to payments@irts.ie

The call EI77WAW is associated with the County of Limerick, located in the midwest of ireland. Limerick is located at the head of the Shannon Estuary, where the river widens before in flows into the Atlantic Ocean. Located on the bank of the estuary is Foynes, a small town that became the base for a flying boat transatlantic passanger service. The original surveying flights were made by Charles Lindeburg in 1933. Eventually Pan Am and BOAC operated services from Foynes, starting in 1937 to Botwood, Newfoundland, followed by regular flights to New York, Southampton, Montreal, Poole and Lisbon. During the second world war Foynes became one of the largest civilian airports in Europe. Foynes closed in 1946 and the original terminal building now houses a museum where, amongst other attractions, you can try your hand at flying the Boeing 314 simulator.



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